Life is the best gift you can give.

Our goal is to help educate people about organ and tissue donation in South Africa.

 

Tell your friends, tell your family, make it known.

Because we believe the most important part of organ and tissue donation, is conversation.

 

One conversation can save up to 8 lives.

Only 0,2% of South Africans are registered organ donors. But even then, your wishes might not be fulfilled. We want to end the waiting list by starting the conversation that matters most.

ABOUT US

TELL (Transplant Education for Living Legacies) was created in 2018 with heart for hearts (and other organs). Two of the three founders and directors are lung transplant recipients, which not only gave them a second chance at life, but also put them in the unique position to make a difference in the transplant community.

Through years of collective experience in the field, we have identified various hurdles to organ transplantation in South Africa. The issues range from legal, to social, to stigmas and stereotypes. It is our mission to solve as many of these problems as possible, so that we can end the waiting list, together.

Because the most important part of organ and tissue donation, is conversation.

MEET THE TEAM

Alice Vogt

Managing Director

Alice was born with Cystic Fibrosis, and had a double lung transplant in 2008 at the age of 23, and then again in 2017 at the age of 33. She is the first person in SA to survive two bi-lateral lung transplants, and has participated in three World Transplant Games.

Fawn Rogers

Marketing Director

Fawn was born with Cystic Fibrosis, a chronic illness that destroyed her lungs and made it necessary for her to have a double lung transplant in 2013. After she recovered, she began her career in digital marketing and opened her own digital agency.

Bonnie Venter

Director - Legal Affairs

Bonnie completed her LL.B degree at NWU and her LL.M in 2012. She was admitted as an Advocate of the High Court of South Africa in 2012 and currently holds the position of Health Law Lecturer at the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Witwatersrand.

THE DONATION PROCESS

1. IDENTIFY
First a patient is identified as a potential donor.

2. REFER
First a patient is identified as a potential donor.

3. CONSENT
First a patient is identified as a potential donor.

4. TRANSPLANT
First a patient is identified as a potential donor.

TRANSPLANT STORIES

Peter Leid

| Transplant Stories | No Comments
Organ Donation is a conversation, and we want to#TellYourStory. Today we feature the story of Peter Leid, who received a Bi Lateral Lung Transplant in February 2008. 1. How long…

Anchen van Dyk

| Transplant Stories | No Comments
Organ Donation is a conversation, and we want to#TellYourStory. Today we feature the story of Anchen Van Dyk from Brackenfell in the Western Cape. 1. Which organ/tissue did you receive,…

JP Cawood

| Transplant Stories | No Comments
Organ Donation is a conversation, and we want to#TellYourStory. Today we feature the story of JP Cawood who lives at the Sun City Resort in the North West Province. 1.…

Meena Singh

| Transplant Stories | One Comment
Organ Donation is a conversation, and we want to#TellYourStory. Today we feature the story of Meena Singh from Johannesburg. 1. Which organ/tissue did you receive, and in what year?  I…

FACTS AND FAQ’S

Can I donate organs while I’m still alive?

Yes! In South Africa it is possible (in specific cases) to donate a kidney, or a part of your liver, to a person in need should you be a blood group and tissue type match.

How do I become an organ donor?

Firstly, you can register with the Organ Donor Foundation, however the law in South Africa states that you need to make your intentions to donate known by either specifying it in your will, or in a legal  document, or by making it known with at least 2 witnesses present. It is important to note that hospitals tend to follow the practise where family is consulted concerning a person’s final wishes. This makes it even more important for you to tell your tribe, tell your team and make it known that you want to be a donor.

How long do you wait for an organ when you’re on the list?

Without enough organ donors, many people awaiting their second  chance at life remain on the list for years. Even worse, a lot of people on  the list end up dying due to a lack of donors.

How many people are currently awaiting organs?

There is no conclusive list of the number of patients currently awaiting a life saving organ transplant in South Africa. In 2016 the Organ Donor Foundation estimated that there are over 4300 people on the list, but experts believe that this figure is now far greater as the shortage of organs continues to grow.

How many people are registered as donors?

Currently, only 0,2% of South Africans are registered organ donors. But even so, their wishes may not get fulfilled. Which is why we encourage people to talk to their family and loved ones, to make sure you make it known.

Is there financial compensation for being a donor?

Being an organ/tissue donor is a selfless act which saves and improves the lives of countless grateful recipients. No financial compensation is received, and trading or selling organs and tissue is illegal. There is also no cost involved in becoming a donor, and also no further medical expenses are incurred by the family once brain stem death is diagnosed and the family has given consent for donation.

What can we do to help end the waiting list?

The most important part of organ and tissue donation, is conversation. The only way we can end the waiting list is for people to make it known that they intend to donate. Have the conversation with your family, your friends and even with your family doctor. The more people know, the easier it will be when the time comes.

Who can be an organ/tissue donor? Is there an age limit?

No! Any person can be a possible organ and tissue donor. All tests to see if you are eligible to be a donor are done at the time of your death, once your family has given consent for your organs to be donated. There is no age limit, because there is no age limit to people who need organs!

SPONSORS